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Parenting Plan Issues and Situations a Parenting Plan Address

Parenting Plan Issues and Situations a Parenting Plan Address

The avoidance of litigation during a divorce is not always a viable option if the spouses have not maintained amicable relations. However, should the need arise to institute child custody arrangements, a court hearingdivorce settlement. The child may have been enduring a great deal of stress prior to that event, and although they may not have express it, children can sense when parents cannot cooperate with one another.
 The child is the most important issue at the center of a divorce. Many parents may harbor bitter feelings and hostility towards one another, but most are willing to put those feelings aside when it comes to making decisions that will affect the child’s life. Many parents don’t realize how many decisions they make separately and jointly on a daily basis regarding the child until the day comes when their family life is disrupted. It is not unusual for one or both parents to forget very important issues that will affect the child’s life when developing a divorce parenting plan; this is not due to the fact that the parents do not care about the child or do not have the child’s best interests on their mind, rather, it is because many aspects of a parenting plan will address issues that neither of the parents in question ,have seldom considered on a daily basis.
The number of daily decisions that a parent makes on behalf of their children is staggering. Taking this dynamic into consideration, the true nature of the affectations of children should be taken into consideration during a custody battle. Though both parents may feel entitled, wrong, and resolute, none of these sentiments allow for a docile and calm retreats for their respective child, if they create hostile and antagonistic environments.
Because most parents have never been alone with their child for a long period of time, they may not realize all the different stipulations, issues and situations they may need to address in the development of parenting plans. Before beginning the draft of a parenting plan, it often a good idea to think of what the child goes through on a daily basis, as well as preparing your child for extraordinary circumstances.
 
When one falls into a pattern of family living where each parent has their own set of parental and household responsibilities, one sometimes cannot realize what other needs must be met for the child, especially when the other parent was previously responsible for its completion. Because of this, many courts have required that parents jointly submit a parenting plan for their child prior to a custody decision. In addition to saving court time, both parents will have the opportunity to sit down with one another and discuss their responsibilities and concerns regarding the child. If there are multiple children, the parents may want to develop multiple parenting plans, instead of a one size fits all to cover all of the children, as each child is different.

Child Custody Parenting Plan Overview

Child Custody Parenting Plan Overview

The main focus of a parenting plan should be for the care, well-being and development of the child. As a result, a focus on the best interests of the child, rather than the needs of the parents is imperative. For many parents, it can be a task of inconvenience considering everything else that is happening with their pending divorce. It is not uncommon for the parents to lose sight of the purpose of the parenting plan. An enforcement of and adherence to a parenting plan is based on the child’s best interest and welfare. 
Decisions should be made based on what is best for the child, rather than what fits best into the parent’s schedules. They may also want to think about how far they will live from each other, as that is the first thing to consider before you can make any decision on any issue regarding the child. In addition, parents must realize that in their life prior to divorce, parents had the option to rearrange their schedules and plans on a whim. After the divorce, they will no longer have that option, so whatever agreements they come to, they must be honored. 
Breaking an agreement on the parenting plan affects not only your spouse, but also your child. The manner in which it is written must also be for long term practicality. The child will not remain the same age forever, and as they grow, their lifestyles and activities will change. Parents must consider this also when developing a parenting plan. A child’s life in unpredictable and addressing all of the issues and situations that may arise throughout their life, in a single parenting plan, is often impossible. 
With everything that parents must keep in mind when developing a parenting plan, it may seem like a daunting task. Luckily, parents can turn to many different sources for assistance. For those parents who are developing a parenting plan for the first time, they may find a parenting plan template helpful in guiding them through some of the more important issues and some of the less thought about issues. 
Some of the more common issues addressed in a parenting plan include where the child will live and which parent the child will live with, the amount of time that the child will spend with each parent, the amount of time that the child will spend with their extended families on both the maternal and paternal side, which parent will help the child with homework and other daily activities and whether the parents can both attend important events, how to share parental responsibilities of big decisions educational and health care arrangements for special occasions and holidays, how to keep in touch with the other parent when the child is not with them, how to agree on long term issues that may arise as the child gets older, how to deal with circumstances that may change for either parent or child, and the agreement on a process to resolve any changes that may be made in the parenting plan. 
This last issue is very important, as it serves as a catch-all for all the unforeseen circumstances that may come about in the future as the child continues to grow. Some issues that parents may forget to include are where to stow the child’s belongings. Also, both parents must consider how they will split transportation for the child for different events.

Process of Parenting Plan Binding Arbitration

Process of Parenting Plan Binding Arbitration

The difficulty and at times inability of an individual to communicate with one’s spouse during a time of divorce is a common occurrence. Many times, one or both spouses may feel hurt or confused about why the divorce settlement is taking place. It is expected that these emotions will be felt, but these feelings should not have to affect the children of the marriage. Although initially, one might find it difficult to accept the dissolution of a marriage, it prevents progress and mutual respect in other aspects of the divorce. One of the most important things to come out of a marriage is a child. 
In order to protect the child from the chaos of divorce, as well as allow their best interests to take priority, it may be necessary for the parents to communicate an agreement of custody arrangements, or a parenting plan, when it comes to the child. Although the ideal situation would be for both the parents to come together and develop this parenting plan, sometimes the parents may have a difficult time agreeing with one another. When hostility is unavoidable, it is sometimes necessary to look to other options to guide them through the process of developing a parenting plan. 
The process of going through the court system can be expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, parents may choose to enlist the help of an arbitrator for the development of a parenting plan. Arbitration does not necessarily have to be legally binding. Parents may choose to use the arbitrator as a form of mediation in assisting the parents to come to an agreement over issues and stipulations on the parenting plan. However, the option to make the parenting plan legally recognized is also an option. This type of arbitration is called a binding arbitration. Binding arbitration is a form of alternative dispute resolution. It is a legal form of resolution that occurs outside of the courts. Binding arbitration is legally binding so you will gain the benefits of legal recognition without having to go through the court systems. For this reason, courts do recommend binding arbitration as opposed to filing a hearing to resolve the development of a parenting plan. 
During a typical session of arbitration, a third party will sit down with each parent, separately if need be, and listen to them before coming to an agreement for a finalized parenting plan. Some parents may choose to develop the parenting plan with the help of the arbitrator without ever having to see the other parent, if they so choose. Arbitration is still the recommended method for devising a parenting plan as both parents will still be able to have their input and the child will not have to deal with the stresses of the courts. This type of resolution may spare the child from having to see both the parents stressed out over dealing with one another, or even openly arguing with one another. If there are still disputes that are unresolved through an arbitrator, both parents may need to resolve the disagreements with the court.
For those parents who are still unable to come to an agreement with their parenting plan, it may be a good idea to consider binding arbitration. Just because a marriage is severed, a relationship with a child is permanent, and both parents must find a way to decide on life decisions for the child. For those parents who choose not to face one another, binding arbitration provides them with a method of communicating through a third party, adding an element of objectivity to an emotionally-charged situation.

Understanding Parenting Plan Enforcement

Understanding Parenting Plan Enforcement

Oftentimes, in the midst a divorce proceeding, couples are loathe to speak to one another. Some divorces are more contentious than others, but when the marriage produces a child, the considerations of a child  and the respective needs of the child, take precedence over a majority of extraneous details. Child custody cases will often stem from divorces, and although it would be ideal for both parents to put aside differences for their child, that is not always the case. 
In such cases, child custody cases often turn into a battle for child custody rights. Provided that there exists an amicable relationship between the parents and child, neither parent wants to be the one to lose child custody rights. For this reason, some courts now request that a parenting plan be submitted jointly by both parents prior to a decision in child custody cases. However, many parenting plans are not legally binding. In the case that an agreement cannot be made between the two parents or one parent refuses to abide by the agreement, the court may become involved in the enforcement of the adherence to a finalized parenting plan.
If an agreement cannot be made, the parents may choose to go to court. This is usually a situation that is less than ideal in child custody cases, as it is often time-consuming, expensive and traumatic for the child. Anytime that a trip to court can be avoided, it would behoove the parents to do so. Many times, a child can sense when their parents cannot come to a decision relating to the child’s daily life and this can become an added source of stress for the child in question. If the parents have already decided on a parenting plan, but for one reason or another, the agreements are not kept, the court may decide to make the agreement legally binding. It will be taken into account as long as the agreement is signed and dated by both parents, written down, and made free from threats and pressure.
If the parents could not come to any agreement, the last resort may be for the judge to assign a parenting plan to both parents. This is obviously not an ideal situation for either parents or the child. With no say in how the agreement is created, it may be an inconvenience to both the child and the parents. If only one parent submits a parenting plan, without the other parent’s input, the court will consider it if it is in the child’s ad litem may be assigned to the child while the judge determines who will receive child custody rights.
 
The ideal situation in child custody cases would include the cooperation of both parents for the benefit of the child, instead of focusing on making the case a battle for child custody rights. If both parents can put aside their differences for the benefit of the child, the battle for child custody rights can often be avoided with both parents receiving joint custody.