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What Are Reasonable Visitation

What Are Reasonable Visitation

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What Are Reasonable Visitation
When a couple divorces, there are many legal issues that are likely to arise. If a couple has children, than custody, visitation and child support are three issues that must be dealt with. If the parent's of the child can come to a reasonable visitation schedule, than the courts will usually allow them to make their own schedule. Making a reasonable visitation schedule is beneficial to all involved for a number of reasons.
 Divorces are hard on all parties involved. Children of divorces may have a hard time accepting the fact that their parents are no longer together. To make the transition easier on the children, parents should take the time to work out a reasonable visitation schedule that allows the child to see both parents as much as possible. A court may let the parents come up with a reasonable visitation schedule if they can agree on one that is fair and balanced. A truly reasonable visitation schedule takes the needs of both parents and the children into account. 

When a couple divorces there may be bitter feelings involved on one or both sides. Parents should try to not let these feelings get in the way of making a reasonable visitation schedule. The best interest of the child is usually to spend a fair amount of time with each parent. Divorces are a way of separating the parents from each other, not from their children. While the parent with primary custody does tend to have more of a say over how reasonable visitation should be handled, both spouse's schedule should taken into account. Fairness is important when it comes to making a reasonable visitation schedule. 
 Just as a family court makes final decisions when it comes to divorces, they also have the power to do so in the case of visitation and custody issues. If parents cannot come to a reasonable visitation agreement, they may step in to make a schedule for them. It is preferable for a couple to come to a reasonable visitation schedule on their own, without court interference. At the very least it will show a family court judge that both parties are willing to be flexible and put aside any hard feelings they may have toward each other to benefit the child.
There may be times when a reasonable visitation schedule has to change due to new schedules or needs of the parents or children involved. There are also times when the non-custodial parent will not stick to the reasonable visitation schedule. If this happens, the custodial parent can request to dismiss the reasonable visitation schedule and have the visitation times be altered.


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