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A Short Guide to Utah Alimony Calculators What is a Utah alimony calculator? Alimony calculators are intended to assist individuals in estimating an alimony award given a particular situation. They are most useful in states that employ mathematical formulas to decide alimony. Other states, like Utah, have only very broad guidelines, which means that there are no accurate alimony calculators for Utah in existence. However, the good news is that you can still estimate an eventual alimony award once you know enough about Utah law and its practices. Are there any Utah alimony calculators? Though they are not based on any formula based on state law, there are several alimony calculators that might be able to help you find a ballpark figure of what your monthly alimony amount might me. For instance, consider what is called the Income Equalization Formula. It works as follows: 1. Calculate the Gross Monthly Income of both parties. That means all monthly income before taxes, less any operating costs if you’re self-employed or own your own business. 2. Now calculate the Net Monthly Income of both parties. That means Gross Monthly Income, minus all taxes and also any child support obligations. 3. Add the two Net Monthly Incomes together. 4. Now divide the Combined Net Monthly Income by 2. That’s the Average Net Monthly Income. 5. Now subtract from the Average Net Monthly Income the smaller Net Monthly Income. The difference between the smaller Net Monthly Income and the Average Monthly Income is the amount that this Utah alimony calculator says the other party might have to pay. Consider a divorcing couple. One is a talent agent who makes $5,000 Net Monthly Income. The other is an artist who makes $1,000 Net Monthly income. $5,000 + $1,000 = $6,000. Split in two that is $3,000. $3,000 - $1,000 is $2,000, and that is the projected spousal support request according to this Utah alimony calculator. Keep in mind that this might be a high estimate, and final discretion is always given to the judge. Which factors should a Utah alimony calculator consider? There are several factors Utah Law mandates a judge to factor into their Utah alimony calculator. They include: 1. The length of the marriage, with a longer marriage usually indicating a longer period 2. The needs of both spouses and their financial abilities to meet those needs. 3. Whether either spouse contributed to the other’s education or earning capacity during the marriage. 4. Whether either spouse worked with or directly or indirectly for the other spouse, particularly if they worked in a business owned by the other spouse. 5. Whether the spouse paying alimony is able to pay while also meeting their own financial needs. 6. Whether the spouse requesting alimony has custody of minor children which makes employment outside the home inappropriate. 7. Whether fault has been attributed to one party as part of the divorce procedure. If you’d like to know more, you should read the statute that the above factors are derived from here.
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  • Alimony Calculator Utah

    A Short Guide to Utah Alimony Calculators

    What is a Utah alimony calculator?

    Alimony calculators are intended to assist individuals in estimating an alimony award given a particular situation. They are most useful in states that employ mathematical formulas to decide alimony. Other states, like Utah, have only very broad guidelines, which means that there are no accurate alimony calculators for Utah in existence. However, the good news is that you can still estimate an eventual alimony award once you know enough about Utah law and its practices.

    Are there any Utah alimony calculators?

    Though they are not based on any formula based on state law, there are several alimony calculators that might be able to help you find a ballpark figure of what your monthly alimony amount might me. For instance, consider what is called the Income Equalization Formula. It works as follows:

    1. Calculate the Gross Monthly Income of both parties. That means all monthly income before taxes, less any operating costs if you’re self-employed or own your own business.

    2. Now calculate the Net Monthly Income of both parties. That means Gross Monthly Income, minus all taxes and also any child support obligations.

    3. Add the two Net Monthly Incomes together.

    4. Now divide the Combined Net Monthly Income by 2. That’s the Average Net Monthly Income.

    5. Now subtract from the Average Net Monthly Income the smaller Net Monthly Income. The difference between the smaller Net Monthly Income and the Average Monthly Income is the amount that this Utah alimony calculator says the other party might have to pay.

    Consider a divorcing couple. One is a talent agent who makes $5,000 Net Monthly Income. The other is an artist who makes $1,000 Net Monthly income.

    $5,000 + $1,000 = $6,000.

    Split in two that is $3,000.

    $3,000 - $1,000 is $2,000, and that is the projected spousal support request according to this Utah alimony calculator.

    Keep in mind that this might be a high estimate, and final discretion is always given to the judge.

    Which factors should a Utah alimony calculator consider?

    There are several factors Utah Law mandates a judge to factor into their Utah alimony calculator. They include:

    1. The length of the marriage, with a longer marriage usually indicating a longer period

    2. The needs of both spouses and their financial abilities to meet those needs.

    3. Whether either spouse contributed to the other’s education or earning capacity during the marriage.

    4. Whether either spouse worked with or directly or indirectly for the other spouse, particularly if they worked in a business owned by the other spouse.

    5. Whether the spouse paying alimony is able to pay while also meeting their own financial needs.

    6. Whether the spouse requesting alimony has custody of minor children which makes employment outside the home inappropriate.

    7. Whether fault has been attributed to one party as part of the divorce procedure.

    If you’d like to know more, you should read the statute that the above factors are derived from here.

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