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Alimony Calculator Kansas

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A Short Introduction to an Alimony Calculator for Kansas Defining a Kansas Alimony Calculator. A Kansas alimony calculator helps is a tool which estimates your annual alimony payment given a few variables related to your finances. They rely on fixed formulas to generate estimates, so they work best for states with very strict guidelines for how judges should calculate alimony. Most of Kansas does not have strict guidelines, which can make finding a Kansas alimony calculator difficult. The Kansas Alimony Calculator for Johnson County Strict guidelines do exist in Johnson County for spousal support, so a Kansas alimony calculator does exist for there. You can access it here: www.alimonyformula.com. The formula for the Kansas alimony calculator in Johnson County is simple: annual alimony is simply one-quarter of the difference between the two spouse’s gross annual incomes. When the difference in gross annual incomes is more than $50,000, alimony is calculated as $12,500 each year (one-quarter of the $50,000) plus just 22% of the remaining difference (instead of 25%). For example, consider a couple with one spouse who is an attorney and makes $128,000 per yearin gross annual income and another who is a legal secretary and makes $28,000 per year. The difference in gross annual incomes amounts to $100,000. Take one-quarter of the first $50,000 of the difference, so $12,5000, and add in 22% of the next $55,000, $11,000. Therefore, the lawyer spouse will pay $23,500 in alimony payments to the legal secretary spouse after a divorce. Duration and the Kansas Alimony Calculator The Johnson County, Kansas alimony calculator also has a formula to calculate how long spousal support will last. 1.If the marriage lasted less that five years, alimony will last for the length of the marriage divided by 2.5. Therefore, the longest alimony could last in such a situation would be 2 years. 2. If the marriage lasted five years of more, the Kansas alimony calculator estimates alimony duration as a period of 2 years plus one-third of the length of the marriage. Therefore, a marriage that lasted six years with instigate four years worth of alimony payments. One that lasts fifteen years will only cause seven years of payments according to the alimony calculator in Kansas. Types of Kansas Alimony There are several different types of spousal support that a Kansas alimony calculator may helpful in estimating for you. When requesting alimony, or anticipating an alimony request, you should predict which is most likely for your situation. 1.General Support: This is the main type of alimony that the Kansas alimony calculator for Johnson County estimates. It is designed to make up the difference in spousal income after a divorce. 2. Transitional Support: This is the alimony that’s also sometimes called rehabilitative, meant to help one spouse gain education to enter the workforce competitively. 3. Reimbursement Support: If one spouse pays for another’s education during a divorce, the educated spouse may be expected to pay reimbursement support. 4. Interim Support: A judge orders interim alimony to be paid during the divorce process.
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  • Alimony Calculator Kansas

    A Short Introduction to an Alimony Calculator for Kansas

    Defining a Kansas Alimony Calculator.

    A Kansas alimony calculator helps is a tool which estimates your annual alimony payment given a few variables related to your finances. They rely on fixed formulas to generate estimates, so they work best for states with very strict guidelines for how judges should calculate alimony. Most of Kansas does not have strict guidelines, which can make finding a Kansas alimony calculator difficult.

    The Kansas Alimony Calculator for Johnson County

    Strict guidelines do exist in Johnson County for spousal support, so a Kansas alimony calculator does exist for there. You can access it here: www.alimonyformula.com.

    The formula for the Kansas alimony calculator in Johnson County is simple: annual alimony is simply one-quarter of the difference between the two spouse’s gross annual incomes. When the difference in gross annual incomes is more than $50,000, alimony is calculated as $12,500 each year (one-quarter of the $50,000) plus just 22% of the remaining difference (instead of 25%).

    For example, consider a couple with one spouse who is an attorney and makes $128,000 per year in gross annual income and another who is a legal secretary and makes $28,000 per year. The difference in gross annual incomes amounts to $100,000. Take one-quarter of the first $50,000 of the difference, so $12,5000, and add in 22% of the next $55,000, $11,000. Therefore, the lawyer spouse will pay $23,500 in alimony payments to the legal secretary spouse after a divorce.

    Duration and the Kansas Alimony Calculator

    The Johnson County, Kansas alimony calculator also has a formula to calculate how long spousal support will last.

    1. If the marriage lasted less that five years, alimony will last for the length of the marriage divided by 2.5. Therefore, the longest alimony could last in such a situation would be 2 years.

    2. If the marriage lasted five years of more, the Kansas alimony calculator estimates alimony duration as a period of 2 years plus one-third of the length of the marriage. Therefore, a marriage that lasted six years with instigate four years worth of alimony payments. One that lasts fifteen years will only cause seven years of payments according to the alimony calculator in Kansas.

    Types of Kansas Alimony

    There are several different types of spousal support that a Kansas alimony calculator may helpful in estimating for you. When requesting alimony, or anticipating an alimony request, you should predict which is most likely for your situation.

    1. General Support: This is the main type of alimony that the Kansas alimony calculator for Johnson County estimates. It is designed to make up the difference in spousal income after a divorce.

    2. Transitional Support: This is the alimony that’s also sometimes called rehabilitative, meant to help one spouse gain education to enter the workforce competitively.

    3. Reimbursement Support: If one spouse pays for another’s education during a divorce, the educated spouse may be expected to pay reimbursement support.

    4. Interim Support: A judge orders interim alimony to be paid during the divorce process.

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